From the Sidewalk to the Street

Can Street Demonstrations Compete with the Internet?

17 December 2019

This year is marked by people going out in protest on the streets. What can they achieve and how do politicians divert attention from demonstrations?

Last week, fifty thousand people protested in the streets of Prague. Last Saturday, San Giovanni Square in Rome filled up with crowds in opposition against the far-right League. Tomorrow, people in Poland are going to take to the streets again.

Demonstrations or happenings

Sardines Day took place last Saturday, on 14 December. In Rome, Berlin, Paris, Dublin, London, Edinburgh, Amsterdam, Madrid, Helsinki, Vienna, Lisbon, Bordeaux, San Francisco, Dresden, Grenoble and other cities, people took to the streets to protest against the politics of populism, hatred and fear.

In Italy, the Sardines movement was born as a protest against the politics of Matteo Salvini. In just one month the Sardines gained hundreds of thousands of supporters. The first event was held on 14 November in Bologna, a traditionally left-wing city.

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Gabriela Rogowska

Translator and Supporting Editor of Res Publica Nowa and Visegrad Insight. A graduate of cultural studies (Mediterranean studies) and philosophy at the University of Warsaw.

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