Putin is Evil, Not Mentally Ill, a Psychological Explanation

The west's attempts to rationalise Moscow's moves miss the point — Interview with Roman Kechur

4 March 2022

Volodymyr Semkiv

‘He is a colossus on clay feet. Putin will do one or more other evil things. This will kill more people. But the verdict has already been passed. And it will be implemented soon enough.’

Roman Kechur, Lviv psychiatrist, Ukraine
Roman Kechur, Lviv psychiatrist, Ukraine

Is Putin really mentally ill? Is he able to press the ‘nuclear button?’ What role does Ukraine play in the St. Petersburg backyard against the ‘cool guy with thin skin?’ Interview with Roman Kechur, President of the Ukrainian Confederation of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapies.

I remember various security conferences in Ukraine a few years ago. Each time, when one of the Ukrainians would say that Putin had mental health problems, foreign guests would turn away. Or at best, such appeals were perceived as a metaphor. Instead, the fresh European and American press is now worried: is Putin really sick?

Europeans and Americans are trying to build a rational culture. In general, Western culture itself is rationally oriented, built on a rational perception of the world. It believes that people should choose something good and avoid something bad. It believes that when sanctions are imposed, someone should back down a bit. That is, to react more rationally — as a rational person would do. But Putin is not responding. As an agreement is reached with Putin, he signs papers, gives an ‘honest word,’ looks his counterpart in the eye, shakes hands. In a second, he deceives and humiliates. In the West, normal and rational people may read this as a mental illness. In the nineteenth century, there were attempts to outline such a deviation as ‘moral madness’ — now most experts do not look at it that way.

Subscribe

Democratic security comes at a price. What is yours? By subscribing or donating now gain access to analysis, forecasts and scenarios by leading analysts and reporters who monitor democratic risks and develop policy debate from Central Europe on Central Europe.

MonthlyVAT included

€4/month

See all details

  • Full access to articles and reports
  • Monthly foresights and risk analysis delivered by e-mail
  • Weekly newsletter with most important highlights
  • Visegrad Insight social media community groups invitation

AnnualVAT included

€40/year

See all details

  • All monthly features PLUS…
  • Free invitation to one editorial board discussion to participate in deciding on the future direction of the Visegrad Insight
  • Free delivery of two select hardcopies of Visegrad Insight reports

Student (Donation)

Choose your contribution

See all details

  • Full access to articles and reports
  • Monthly foresights, weekly newsletters, and risk analysis delivered by e-mail
  • Free invitation to one editorial board discussion to participate in deciding on the future direction of the Visegrad Insight (annual subscription only)

Can I receive an invoice?

Yes. You will receive a receipt immediately after purchase and a VAT invoice upon request. The subscription amount includes tax. In case of a donation, there is no tax.

Are my credit card details safe?

Yes. The payment is processed by STRIPE www.stripe.com entrusted also by Amazon, Zoom, Booking.com and used by other global NGOs and businesses in the world. We do not store your credit card details.

How modify or cancel my subscription?

At any moment you can manage your subscription and account details. Sign in to modify or cancel.

Newsletter

Weekly updates with our latest articles and the editorial commentary.